Author Of U.S. Military Code Of Conduct Passes Away

It was reported on Oct. 8, 2006 in the San Diego Union-Tribune that US Marine Col. F. Brooke Nihart passed away on Aug. 30, 2006 at the age of 87 in Fairfax, VA.  He was the author of the U.S. Military Code of Conduct that was originally written in 1955, and slightly revised in 1977.

He was a veteran of WWII (Battle of Wake Island & Battle of Okinawa) and the Korean War (Battle of the Punchbowl).  During his career he was awarded the Navy Cross, two Bronze Stars, the Defense Meritorious Service Medal the Meritorious Service Medal, and Air Medal.

It should also be noted that from 1972 to 1991 he was a historian and deputy director of Marine Corps museums.


WTOC11 Covers WWII Veteran's Recent Awarding Of Military Medals

WTOC11 has a short news article on WWII veteran Jack Phelps finally getting his military medals earned during his nine years of service. 

He joined the U.S. Army when he was 18, and was part of the D-Day Normandy Beach landing.  A total of eleven medals were awarded including a Purple Heart, Bronze Star and World War II victory medal.


New Book - Operation Homecoming

Boeing and other defense contractors are supporting a new project by author Andrew Carroll and the National Endowment of the Arts called "Operation Homecoming." 

This book tells the "moving personal stories" of those serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, and at home in support of the Global War On Terrorism (GWOT).  It also includes perspectives of friends and family of those serving.


Cold War Recon Mission Honored With Awards

Military.com:

"Just three years after the Berlin Airlift and as Americans were still fighting in the Korean War, American leaders needed to know if the Soviet military was establishing an airfield capable of basing fighter aircraft, TU-4 bombers and establishing radar facilities in an unknown arctic Soviet territory.

"To determine if the Soviets were expanding into the artic area that could have made American and NATO targets vulnerable to an attack, Tech. Sgt. Roscoe Lindsay and 11 other aircrew members on an RB-50E based at Thule Air Base, Greenland, flew their jet to photograph the area to find out without a shadow of a doubt."